Diana Wallin

Entering Class - 2011

E-MAIL: wallin@umn.edu

UNDERGRAD INSTITUTION AND MAJOR:
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, BS in Physics, 2007

GRADUATE ADVISOR
Michael Georgieff, M.D., Department of Pediatrics
THESIS COMMITTEE MEMBERS

DESCRIPTION OF GRADUATE RESEARCH
Oxygen and iron are important for children’s brains to develop properly. Parts of the brain responsible for learning and memory are rapidly developing in early life, and anemia can cause developmental problems that remain throughout adulthood. By studying this problem in a mouse model of phlebotomy-induced anemia, I hope to be able to better understand what happens metabolically to the developing brain so physicians can make better informed decisions about prevention and treatment of early-life anemia.

RESEARCH CATEGORIES

  • Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Developmental Neuroscience
  • Neuroimaging and Optogenetics

GRADUATE LEVEL AWARDS AND HONORS

  • Ruth L. Kirschstein National Research Service Award (NRSA) Individual Predoctoral Fellowship
  • Selected to attend 2015 Mortimer D. Sackler, MD Summer Institute
  • Selected to attend 2015 Clinical and Translational Research Course for Ph.D. Students at the NIH Clinical Center
  • CTSI Translational Research Development Program Scholar, 2014-2016

GRADUATE LEVEL PUBLICATIONS

  • Wallin D, Tkac I, Stucker S, Ennis K, Sola-Visner M, Rao R, Georgieff MK. (2016) Phlebotomy-induced anemia alters hippocampal neurochemistry in neonatal mice. Pediatr Res. 77:765-771.
  • Kennedy BC, Wallin, D, Tran PV, Georgieff MK. Advancing Research on Fetal Development. Kisilevsky BS, editor. New York, NY: Springer‐Verlag; 2015. In: Long‐term Brain and Behavioral Consequences of Early Life Iron Deficiency.

GRADUATE LEVEL ABSTRACTS

  • Wallin D, Kennedy B, Benneyworth M, Macheda T, Gewirtz J, Georgieff M.  (2015) Neonatal phlebotomy-induced anemia results in behavioral deficits in adult mice. Poster Presentation. Translational Science (Association for Clinical and Translational Science), Washington, DC.
  • Tkac I, Wallin D, Zamora T, Ennis K, Stein A, Georgieff M, Rao R. (2013) Hippocampal neurochemical changes in neonatal mouse model of phlebotomy-induced anemia. International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT.
  • Wallin D, Zamora T, Tkac I, Ennis K, Stein A, Rao R, Georgieff M. (2013) The effect of phlebotomy-induced anemia on hippocampal metabolism in neonatal mice.  Pediatric Academic Societies, Washington, DC, 2013.
  • Wallin D, Zamora T, Tkac I, Ennis K, Stein A, Rao R, Georgieff M. (2013) Phlebotomy-induced anemia alters metabolism and gene expression in the neonatal mouse hippocampus.  Society for Neuroscience, San Diego, CA.

PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS

  • Long-term Behavioral Effects of Early-Life Phlebotomy-Induced Anemia. Graduate Program in Neuroscience Colloquium Series, University of Minnesota, April 2015.
  • Neonatal phlebotomy-induced anemia results in behavioral deficits in adult mice. Wallin D, Kennedy B, Benneyworth M, Macheda T, Gewirtz J, Georgieff M. Platform Presentation. Pediatric Academic Societies, San Diego, CA, 2015.
  • Neonatal phlebotomy-induced anemia results in behavioral deficits in adult mice. Wallin D, Kennedy B, Benneyworth M, Macheda T, Gewirtz J, Georgieff M. Oral Presentation. Translational Science (Association for Clinical and Translational Science), Washington, DC, 2015.
  • Effects of Phlebotomy-Induced Anemia (PIA) on Neonatal Hippocampal Metabolism. Graduate Program in Neuroscience Colloquium Series, University of Minnesota, May 2014.

ROTATIONS

GPN COMMITTEES

  • Student Board Class Representative, 2011-2013
  • Awards Committee, 2014-2016

PROFESSIONAL OUTREACH

  • State Fair Brain Awareness Booth, 2012-present
  • Brain Awareness Week, 2012-present

INTERNSHIPS

  • Medtronic, Science and Technology, Summer Associate, Summer 2006

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

  • Society for Neuroscience, 2013-present
  • Association for Clinical and Translational Science, 2015-present
Diana Wallin