Matthew Green

Entering Class - 2013

E-MAIL: gree1835@umn.edu

UNDERGRAD INSTITUTION AND MAJOR:
University of Illinois, B.S. in Molecular and Cellular Biology, 2012

GRADUATE ADVISOR
Stanley Thayer, Ph.D., Department of Pharmacology

THESIS COMMITTEE MEMBERS

DESCRIPTION OF GRADUATE RESEARCH
My thesis work aims to delineate some of the mechanisms for changes in neuronal networks during prolonged exposure to neurotoxic HIV proteins, such as HIV-1 Tat. Specifically, I am looking at how NMDAR function changes during prolonged exposure to these proteins. My research has shown that different NMDAR subtypes differentially regulate adaptations of neural networks during exposure to Tat. I primarily use electrophysiological techniques to study NMDARs in vitro, and will be developing in vivo assays to study how neural networks adapt to Tat as well.

RESEARCH AREAS

  • Neurodegenerative Diseases and Neural Injury
  • Synaptic Plasticity and Learning

GRADUATE LEVEL PUBLICATIONS

  • Ghosh B, Green MV, Krogh KA, Thayer SA. Interleukin-1β activates a Src family kinase to stimulate the plasma membrane Ca2+ pump in hippocampal neurons. J Neurophysiol. 2016 Feb 3;:jn.00541.2015. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Krogh KA, Green MV, Thayer SA. (2014) HIV-1 tat-induced changes in synaptically-driven network activity adapt during prolonged exposure. Curr HIV Res. 12:406-414.

GRADUATE LEVEL ABSTRACTS

  • Green MV, Thayer SA. (2015) Adaptation of synaptic NMDARs during HIV Tat-induced neurotoxicity. Society for Neuroscience 2015, Chicago.

ROTATIONS

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

  • Society for Neuroscience, 2012-present

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE UMN?
I chose the University of Minnesota primarily because of the vast number of professors who do outstanding research here. This allows for many collaborations, networking opportunities, and options for first year rotations. I also chose the University of Minnesota because of the coursework that the first year students undergo. The courses are very well-rounded and give all of the students a great foundation of neuroscience that we can take into whatever specialized career path we decide to enter.
WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE A FIRST YEAR GRADUATE STUDENT?
Try new things. First year is a great time to try something new during a rotation that you might not have thought you were interested in before starting graduate school. You learn so much your first year that your views on neuroscience and what interests you changes, so it’s worth doing a rotation through a lab that is outside of your original expertise.

Matt Green