Zoe Christenson Wick

Entering Class - 2014

E-MAIL: chri3433@umn.edu

UNDERGRAD INSTITUTION AND MAJOR:
St. Olaf College, BA, Psychology, 2014

GRADUATE ADVISOR
Esther Krook-Magnuson, Ph.D., Department of Neuroscience

DESCRIPTION OF GRADUATE RESEARCH
My research explores neuronal networks, interneuron diversity, and specificity of function in healthy and epileptic rodent brains. I use a mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy to determine the networks and cell types that play roles in initiating, sustaining, and suppressing seizures using optogenetic, electrophysiological, immunocytochemical, and behavioral techniques.

RESEARCH CATEGORIES

  • Behavioral & Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Neurodegenerative Diseases & Neural Injury

ROTATIONS

OTHER COMMITTEE INVOLVEMENT
Science for All, Mentor, 2015

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE MN?
I chose Minnesota for graduate school because of the emphasis on classes during the first year and, more importantly, because of the supportive and cooperative network of students and faculty. During recruitment weekend it became abundantly clear that the students fostered a really fun and creative community. I was excited about the emphasis on coursework (in the first year) because I wanted to be a well-rounded neuroscientist with knowledge of topics in neuroscience outside the specific expertise I would develop in my lab.

STUDENT MENTOR AND THE BEST ADVICE THEY GAVE.
Abbey Becker is my student mentor and the best advice I received from her was to prioritize choosing an advisor in the following way: 1) the advisor, 2) the techniques you will be using every day, 3) the research topic.

If you don't get along with your advisor, coming to lab every day is going to be painful. If you don't like performing the techniques you'll be doing every day, coming to lab every day is going to be painful. If you originally aren't that interested in the research topic, but you enjoy your advisor and the techniques you're using, you'll probably grow to love your research topic because neuroscience is the coolest and there aren't boring topics in neuroscience.

Zoe Christenson Wick