Kelsey Moore

Entering Class - 2012

E-MAIL: kmmoore@umn.edu

UNDERGRAD INSTITUTION AND MAJOR:
Hope College, B.S. in Biology with minors in Neuroscience and Psychology, 2012

GRADUATE ADVISOR
Robert Meisel, Ph.D., Department of Neuroscience

THESIS COMMITTEE MEMBERS

DESCRIPTION OF GRADUATE RESEARCH
My dissertation work focuses on elucidating patterning of glutamate release in neuroendocrine- and reward-related areas of the hamster brain in response to specific components of female sex behavior. I am also interested in determining the underlying circuitry of these signals and their functional significance on both progestation and motivation for sex using an animal model.

RESEARCH CATEGORIES

  • Drug Abuse and Addiction
  • Behavioral and Cognitive Neuroscience

GRADUATE LEVEL AWARDS AND HONORS

  • Stark Award for Advanced Scholarship, August 2014
  • American Neuroendocrine Society Travel Award, August 2014

GRADUATE LEVEL PUBLICATIONS

  • Been LE, Moore KM, Kennedy BC, Meisel RL. (2016)  Metabotropic glutamate receptor and fragile X signaling in a female model of escalated aggression. Biol. Psychiatry79:685-692.

GRADUATE LEVEL ABSTRACTS

  • Moore K, Been L, Meisel R. (2015) Investigation of glutamate neurotransmission during sex behavior in female Syrian hamsters. Abstract for poster presentation, Society for Neuroscience annual meeting, Chicago, IL.
  • Moore K, Been L, Meisel R. (2014) Neurotransmitter measurement during sexual behavior in female Syrian hamsters. Abstract for poster presentation, Society for Neuroscience annual meeting, Washington D.C.
  • Moore K, Been L, Meisel R. (2014) Aggressive experience increases PSD-95 in the nucleus accumbens of female hamsters via the fragile X mental retardation protein signaling pathway. Abstract for poster presentation, International Congress of Neuroendocrinology/Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology conference, Sydney, Australia.
  • Moore K, Been L, Meisel R. (2014) Increased accumbal glutamate release during sex behavior in female hamsters. Abstract for poster presentation, Organization for the Study of Sex Differences annual meeting, Minneapolis, MN.

PROFESSIONAL PRESENTATIONS

  • Investigation of glutamate neurotransmission during sex behavior in female Syrian hamsters. Oral presentation at Department of Neuroscience Colloquium Series, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, March 4 2015.

ROTATIONS

GPN COMMITTEES

  • Member, Graduate Program in Neuroscience Faculty Status Committee, January 2013-May 2015
  • Student Board, Fourth-Year Representative, May 2015-present

OTHER COMMITTEE INVOLVEMENT

  • Advanced Professional Degree Consulting Club, Member, Fall 2015-present.

PROFESSIONAL OUTREACH

  • Volunteer, Annual Brain Bee competition at University of Minnesota Fall 2012
  • Volunteer, Brain Awareness booth at the Minnesota State Fair, Summer 2013 and 2014
  • Volunteer, Brain Awareness demonstration at the Science Museum of Minnesota, Fall 2014, 2015, and Spring 2016.

PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS

  • Organization for the Study of Sex Differences
  • Society for Behavioral Neuroendocrinology
  • Society for Neuroscience

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE MN?
I chose University of Minnesota over several other graduate programs in neuroscience because of our excellent environment for fostering independent scientists. Not only is our curriculum exemplary in setting up a broad foundation of knowledge, but we have an excellent funding history with several institutional training grants within our department alone. The breadth of different neuroscience research happening at the university also allows students to study practically any neuroscience topic.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE A FIRST YEAR GRADUATE STUDENT?

The most important decision you will make in your graduate career is the lab you choose. Make sure that your educational goals overlap with the expectations of your advisor, and that you feel you can openly communicate with your advisor both regarding your science and your personal goals. Science is hard enough without unnecessary miscommunication and relational stress.

Kelsey Moore